Strategies For Organizational Change Management

As the shared services role continues to expand, the department is seeing an enhanced role in organizational change management. A complicated issue, organizational change management can provide unique opportunities if handled properly, but can produce many problems if the proper steps are not taken. This piece details best practices in ensuring optimal change and focuses on managing unanticipated challenges.

Best Practices

When beginning the process of organizational change management, it is important to start with top management. Convince these executives of the financial returns of such a change and provide clear guidance on how the change would come about. Throughout your presentation, make sure to discuss any risks you foresee and how you will address them. If the executives are convinced, the company’s culture should be your next priority. Since the company’s culture is generated by the staff, consider their perspectives and needs when making an organizational change. Not doing so may increase company costs as you try to convince significant parts of your staff to adopt the new changes. Once you have made the change, be sure to reevaluate your efforts. Measure employee satisfaction before and after the change. If the change appears to result in a net negative impact, determine the pain points and make relevant changes.

Once you have made the change, be sure to reevaluate your efforts. Measure employee satisfaction before and after the change. If the change appears to result in a net negative impact, determine the pain points and make relevant changes.

Managing Unanticipated Challenges

In some instances, like M&A, an organizational change can be unexpected. Those decisions typically come from the C-Suite and should be dealt with appropriately. Develop an action plan that includes the best practices listed above. Provide clear timeframes for the change depending on its scope and other factors. After the change has been completed, report back to the C-suite and Board about the process and any challenges you face. Be sure to emphasize having your team involved in the decision-making of a potential change early. You will be able to advise on how to pursue such a change, if at all. Once the dust of the deal has settled, it may be wise to talk to executives about the importance of clueing the shared services team into future, relevant decisions.

Provide clear timeframes for the change depending on its scope and other factors. After the change has been completed, report back to the C-suite and Board about the process and any challenges you face.

Conclusion

As companies continue to pursue changes to their core functions, the shared services department is in a unique position to improve the business. In following these recommendations, shared services directors will be lauded for their efforts by those at the top. As a result, the department may experience an enhanced role in other important aspects of the business as it considers future changes and improvements.